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Vietnamese Mint – a herb whose leaves are used in Southeast Asian cooking.




Images of Vietnamese Mint at google.com

Vietnamese Mint or Persicaria odorata, the Vietnamese coriander, is an herb whose leaves are used in Southeast Asian cooking.

Overview of Vietnamese Mint

• The leaf is identified with Vietnamese cuisine.
• It is commonly eaten fresh in salads and in raw summer rolls as well as in some soups such as canh chua and bún thang, and stews, such as fish kho t?.
• It is also popularly eaten with h?t v?t l?n (fertilized duck egg).
• In the cuisine of Cambodia, it is used in soups, stews, salads, and the Cambodian summer rolls, naem.
• The Vietnamese coriander is a perennial plant.
• It grows best in tropical and subtropical zones in warm and damp conditions.
• It can grow up to 15 to 30 cm.
• The top of its leaf is dark green, with chestnut-colored spots.
• The leaf’s bottom is burgundy red.

Growing and caring conditions for Vietnamese Mint

• Choose a flower bed location in the direct sun or partial sun.
• Prepare the soil by adding 2 to 4 inches of composted manure per square foot of bedding soil.
• Add 1/2 tablespoon of 16-16-18 fertilizer per square foot and work the manure and fertilizer into the top 6 inches of soil.
• Plant one mint plant every 2 feet.
• Dig a shallow hole, deep enough to cover the root with a small shovel.
• Cover the base of the mint loosely with the shovel.
• Dampen the soil lightly and water the bed once a week.
• Don’t over-water mint as this can make the roots moldy.
• Harvest mint every two to three weeks by clipping the branches down several inches using sharp garden scissors.
• Cut the stems down to 1 inch above the soil at the end of the growing season.
• Mulch your mint patch, if desired.
• Mentha grows too vigorously for weeds to bother it much, but if your garden space lacks adequate water or dappled shade.
• Mulch helps keep the herbs cool and moist.
• Don’t worry about fertilizing your mints.
• The herbs adapt just fine to almost any kind of soil, so save your compost and fish emulsion for pickier plants.
• Unless your mints live in containers, watering is not a concern.
• Mints can take care of themselves.
• Check the soil of your potted-up herbs, including mints, as container soil dries out much more quickly than garden soil.
• Keep pruning, or pinching back, the tips of the plants to encourage healthier, bushy growth and plenty of leaves.
• The plants, especially peppermint, quickly get a leggy, scraggly look when left un-pruned.
• Let some of the plants flower.
• The purple blossoms look lovely in any garden, and make a unique addition to salads, herbal vinegar, jellies and jams.
• The plants will simply die back in the cold months and emerge hale and hearty the following spring.
• Trim the plants close to ground level in the autumn.
• For the colder months, consider potting up a bit of mint for an indoor container.
• Keep the mint watered but not overly moist.
• Place it where it will receive some shade.
• If you’re growing a number of different types of mints, prune them before they flower.
• Once they reach the blossom stage, the plants could interbreed and lose some of their unique properties.
• Consider reviving the old-fashioned tradition of the herbal lawn or herbal bench by using mint plants.
• For a mint lawn or bench, choose small-leaved, lower-height mint varieties, such as Corsican or pennyroyal.





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